Are different dogs different species?

Asked By: Emilie Lind
Date created: Thu, Apr 29, 2021 10:48 AM
Best answers

But among dogs, which are well known for their hybrid (or mongrel) varieties, different breeds can mate and have viable offspring, so they are all found under the umbrella of a single species, Canis familiaris.

Dogs are highly unusual in their variation, from the Chihuahua to the Great Dane.

Answered By: Deven Johnson
Date created: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 12:51 PM
FAQ
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Dogs and cats are distinct species, incapable of producing offspring together because of the many differences in their genome. At least, that's the traditional definition of a species, and it works—for the most part.
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Based on appearances, they look as different as the cat and the dog did, and yet they both belong to the same species.

Dogs actually are part of a sub-species called Canis lupus familiaris that are derived from the grey wolf Canis lupus.

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They are 100% the same species. They are both Canis familiaris: the domesticated dog. They are not even subspecies… Evidence that they are the same species is that a Great Dane can mate with a Chihuahua and produce fertile puppies.
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Dogs are also a known or potential threat to 188 threatened species worldwide: 96 mammal, 78 bird, 22 reptile and three amphibian species.

This includes 30 critically endangered species, two of which are classed as "possibly extinct".

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Domestic dogs are increasingly being recognized as a conservation threat for native species.

In many places, their impacts may be as severe as other invasive predators such as cats and rats.

Approximately 68% of the attacks were carried out by dogs unaccompanied by humans.

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But among dogs, which are well known for their hybrid (or mongrel) varieties, different breeds can mate and have viable offspring, so they are all found under the umbrella of a single species, Canis familiaris.

dogs are highly unusual in their variation, from the Chihuahua to the Great Dane.

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Dogs and cats are distinct species, incapable of producing offspring together because of the many differences in their genome. At least, that's the traditional definition of a species, and it works—for the most part.
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