Get Out!

The Out Command - Learning how to safely give up items of value (like food!) on command and then move off to a safe distance and hold a down/stay or place command so that it is safe for human hands to go pick up those valuable items.During my first sessions teaching the ‘Out’ command, I show the dog what to do when he hears me say the word ‘Out’ by using his remote collar and leash to guide him away from the bone and into command. Once the dog understands the concept of the ‘out’ command we are starting to use different items like food, treats, and toys!What you want to remember with any dog who feels compelled to guard something of value, is that the dog needs to learn two things: 1) They don’t get to ‘own’ anything, they may get to engage with toys, food and treats when given permission by their handler but these things are privileges, not rights and should never be given to a resource guarding dog in the presence of other dogs, kids, other pets, etc. 2) The resource guarding dog must learn to physically and mentally disengage from these items immediately when asked to do so. The further the dog is from a valuable item, the lower it’s value. The closer the dog is to a valuable item, the greater it’s value. So, to safely retrieve a toy or bone from a dog, the dog must drop it and walk away from the toy/bone rather than the treat/bone being removed from the dog. NEVER EVER reach in and try to take something of value from a resource guarding dog or throw something into a group of dogs. NEVER EVER allow other dogs or kids to take something (or even get close to) from a resource guarding dog. That is the perfect opportunity to get bitten or start a nasty fight. Teaching the dog to ‘Out’ the item (so that he spits it out, moves away and no longer wants to posses it) is much safer than pulling it out of the dogs mouth. Likewise, NEVER EVER try to physically remove a resource guarding dog from something he is sitting on or close to that he is guarding like a couch or bed or even empty food dishes or water bowls. Teach the dog how to ‘Out’ (get off and walk away from) from the furniture rather than pulling or pushing him off.

Get Out!


The Out Command - Learning how to safely give up items of value (like food!) on command and then move off to a safe distance and hold a down/stay or place command so that it is safe for human hands to go pick up those valuable items.

During my first sessions teaching the ‘Out’ command, I show the dog what to do when he hears me say the word ‘Out’ by using his remote collar and leash to guide him away from the bone and into command. Once the dog understands the concept of the ‘out’ command we are starting to use different items like food, treats, and toys!

What you want to remember with any dog who feels compelled to guard something of value, is that the dog needs to learn two things:

1) They don’t get to ‘own’ anything, they may get to engage with toys, food and treats when given permission by their handler but these things are privileges, not rights and should never be given to a resource guarding dog in the presence of other dogs, kids, other pets, etc.

2) The resource guarding dog must learn to physically and mentally disengage from these items immediately when asked to do so.

The further the dog is from a valuable item, the lower it’s value. The closer the dog is to a valuable item, the greater it’s value. So, to safely retrieve a toy or bone from a dog, the dog must drop it and walk away from the toy/bone rather than the treat/bone being removed from the dog. NEVER EVER reach in and try to take something of value from a resource guarding dog or throw something into a group of dogs. NEVER EVER allow other dogs or kids to take something (or even get close to) from a resource guarding dog. That is the perfect opportunity to get bitten or start a nasty fight.

Teaching the dog to ‘Out’ the item (so that he spits it out, moves away and no longer wants to posses it) is much safer than pulling it out of the dogs mouth. Likewise, NEVER EVER try to physically remove a resource guarding dog from something he is sitting on or close to that he is guarding like a couch or bed or even empty food dishes or water bowls. Teach the dog how to ‘Out’ (get off and walk away from) from the furniture rather than pulling or pushing him off.