Have Patience With Your Adolescent Dog

This so needs sharing adolescent dogs. Puppy adolescence is such a trying time for dog owners but it is also a very difficult and challenging time for your dog also. Think about teenage people and how tough it is on parents. I am remembering my brother coming home from school to go right up to […] The post Have Patience With Your Adolescent Dog first appeared on So Much PETential.

Have Patience With Your Adolescent Dog

This so needs sharing adolescent dogs. Puppy adolescence is such a trying time for dog owners but it is also a very difficult and challenging time for your dog also. Think about teenage people and how tough it is on parents. I am remembering my brother coming home from school to go right up to his bedroom, close the door and play LOUD rock music. He wouldn’t talk to my mom or any of us, just went straight upstairs. Being the mega athlete in our family, he channeled that energy into tennis mostly and even won the city-wide tournament here. Yes, Brian (and all of us) did get through it to become a pretty incredible example of a human being. As much as your adolescent dog may be frustrating and challenging you to your core, I encourage you to take a deep breath an try to be patient. Know your puppy is feeling that way too.

“When we approach adolescence with patience we can help create a world that is predicable and gentle so our puppies grow up to be their best selves.”
~ Behavior Vets

here is why you should show compassion to your adolescent puppySome pro-active things you can do to help your adolescent dog:

You can give your dog predictability as much as possible.

Anticipate what will ‘trigger’ your dog (like cars, other dogs, active kids) as your dog will be much quicker to react in this developmental stage. You can keep your distance from triggers or redirect before your dog becomes over stimulated, and practice teaching different responses. Look for activities you can do together away from triggers including long sniffing/exploring excursions out in nature.

Give your dog time to do activities that fulfill your dog’s needs for mental and physical stimulation.  Provide plenty of opportunities for chewing, sniffing, foraging, and playing.

Give your dog quiet time to nap, and process information.

If you know someone who has a calm, adult dog with good dog social skills, take a walk together.

You can continue to teach in positive, nurturing ways, breaking it down into smaller, simpler steps.

You can practice reminding yourself that your dog is struggling too and you will get through it TOGETHER.

contact Lisa Desatnikloo

The post Have Patience With Your Adolescent Dog first appeared on So Much PETential.