Is it okay to bring a puppy home at 6 weeks?

Asked By: Taylor Runolfsson
Date created: Tue, Feb 16, 2021 2:14 PM
Best answers

Is it okay to bring a puppy home at six weeks if you really need to? Unfortunately, the answer is – it isn't okay to bring a puppy home at six weeks.

Even more importantly than his need for his mother, a six week old pup needs his litter mates.

Answered By: Tomasa Wilkinson
Date created: Wed, Feb 17, 2021 4:17 PM
If you are still wondering if you can bring a puppy home at 6 weeks, the answer is yes, you can, but you will be doing the dog, your family, and any human being or animal that comes into contact with your dog as it grows up no favors.
Answered By: Rachael Jaskolski
Date created: Sat, Feb 20, 2021 2:29 AM
While most puppies are adopted when they are older, you can get a 6 week old puppy to take home. Learn how to best prepare and care for this young pup before getting it home. Puppy Matters
Answered By: Allie Kunde
Date created: Sat, Feb 20, 2021 2:27 PM
when their puppy is ready to come home – if the greeder says four weeks, then four weeks it is. alike, but the fact is that both dogs and humans are β€œpack animals. Between 6 – 8 weeks is when your puppy will learn bite inhibition from his littermates and will also learn lots of socialization skills and how to act around other puppies.
Answered By: Eino Smith
Date created: Sun, Feb 21, 2021 12:31 PM
I wouldn't advise it unless puppy is completely weaned off of it's mom. And if you have another dog at home. 6 to 8 weeks is when mom teaches it to socialize. If you can, it helps to be home with puppy all the time for 2 weeks. A bond is made and it makes the transition SOOO much easier on you and puppy.
Answered By: Maymie Conn
Date created: Tue, Feb 23, 2021 9:37 AM
Is it okay to bring a puppy home at six weeks if you really need to? Unfortunately, the answer is – it isn't okay to bring a puppy home at six weeks. Even more importantly than his need for his mother, a six week old pup needs his litter mates.
Answered By: Aaron Lindgren
Date created: Thu, Feb 25, 2021 3:35 PM
Unfortunately, the answer is – it isn’t okay to bring a puppy home at six weeks. Even more importantly than his need for his mother, a six week old pup needs his litter mates. So even if his mother were to tragically die, your puppy should still remain with his brothers and sisters for a short while longer.
Answered By: Rosanna Luettgen
Date created: Sat, Feb 27, 2021 7:10 AM
But the general rule of thumb is that puppies should go to their new homes in the 8-to-12 week-old age range. Toy breeds which are smaller than most dogs and very fragile at an early age usually...
Answered By: Buck McCullough
Date created: Sun, Feb 28, 2021 3:37 PM
When you bring a six-week-old puppy into your home, you have the challenge that he has not had enough time with the litter. Typically, puppies need at least eight weeks with the mother and the littermates just to learn the basics of how to be a dog!
Answered By: Mayra Ankunding
Date created: Mon, Mar 1, 2021 1:15 AM
A primary factor in choosing when to send a puppy to a new home is the socialization period. According to veterinarian and behaviorist Dr. Sally Foote, the socialization period in puppies typically...
Answered By: Anibal Cremin
Date created: Tue, Mar 2, 2021 12:06 PM
Although 6 weeks is not the recommended age nowadays it used to be and Guide Dogs still put their puppies in their puppy walking homes at 6 weeks as far as I know. You just have an extra 2 weeks of teaching him how to be a dog and getting him used to household noises, which his mother and breeder would have been doing over the next 2 weeks.
Answered By: Lon Kutch
Date created: Wed, Mar 3, 2021 4:20 AM
FAQ
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How long do I wait before taking my puppy outside? Vets recommend waiting until 10-14 days after your puppy's last vaccination booster – usually at around 14–16 weeks of age – before introducing them to the wonders of local parks, beaches and walking trails.

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By around eight weeks of age your puppy should be eating solid food.

Puppies should be fed three to four times a day therefore if you are currently feeding ΒΎ a cup of puppy food twice a day you should consider spacing it out by feeding Β½ cup three times a day.

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A good rule of thumb is a ratio of five minutes exercise per month of age (up to twice a day) until the puppy is fully grown, i.e.

15 minutes (up to twice a day) when three months old, 20 minutes when four months old etc.

Once they are fully grown, they can go out for much longer.

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Young puppies have short attention spans but you can expect them to begin to learn simple obedience commands such as "sit," "down," and "stay," as young as 7 to 8 weeks of age.

Formal dog training has traditionally been delayed until 6 months of age.

Actually, this juvenile stage is a very poor time to start.

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Feeding adult food will rob your puppy of important nutrients.

Four feedings a day are usually adequate to meet nutritional demands.

Large breeds should be fed unmoistened dry food by 9 or 10 weeks; small dogs by 12 or 13 weeks.

3–6 months: Sometime during this period, decrease feedings from four to three a day.

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When you play with your puppy, let him mouth on your hands.

Continue play until he bites especially hard.

When he does, immediately give a high-pitched yelp, as if you're hurt, and let your hand go limp.

This should startle your puppy and cause him to stop mouthing you, at least momentarily.

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These will include the core vaccines, which are administered in a series of three: at 6-, 12-, and 16 weeks old.

The core vaccines include the DHLPP (distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parvo, and parainfluenza).

Your pup will also need a rabies vaccination, which is usually around $15β€”20.

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