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+2 votes
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3. Once your Boxer is sitting, give praise (Good, sit, good dog), but do not give a treat. 4. Have the leash on the floor, and use your foot to hold it in place. Be sure it has some slack, so that your Boxer can attempt to jump. After all, if he's not allowed to try, he can't learn to control it.
0 votes
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My boxer wraps his wrists so tight He wont tire in the fire, he will win the fight My boxer like a Duracell In the ring, he is the king, he is below the belt In the ring, he is the king, he is below the belt. Mmm man touch. My boxer my defense machine He snaps like this so dont mess with me Watch out!
+9 votes
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Training a Boxer dog to guard is surprisingly straightforward. They are intelligent and relatively easy to train. They are also known to be quite protective so you should be able to bring the guard dog out in him with ease. Youll need to do some territory training to show him where he needs to guard.
–4 votes
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3. Practice the sit command. To make your dog sit, hold a treat in your hand while standing in front of him. Then, use the treat as a lure to get your dog to sit down. Move the treat over your dog's head in an arc so that he will naturally sit down to keep following the treat with his eyes.
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Will My Dog Protect Me From Environmental Dangers. Maybe. Dogs can tell when something is off. Strange smells like gas or more obvious things like fire or a trapped person tell a dog that something bad is happening. The thing is, all dogs are different. While one dog may end up being on the news as the dog who saved his owner by waking him up ...
+5 votes
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5 Myths about Boxers and the Truth Behind Them. The Boxer is a dog breed that originated from Germany, generally used for bull baiting, livestock herding, and as a guard dog. Its a medium to large dog breed at about 21 to 25 inches tall, weighing between 55 to 71 pounds. The lifespan of this crossbreed is around 10 to 12 years.
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My daughter raised her from birth and the rest of us got to know her at about 6 months of age. Let me say that I have come to love this big goofy dog who is very strong-willed, loves children, natural escape artist but also is content to lay down and lick my feet or behind my ears. However, as a protection dog, she inspires no confidence in me.
+3 votes
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Your Boxer's Protective Side

With a protective nature, Boxers make great guard dogs when properly socialized and trained. They form powerful bonds with their families and are especially patient and protective over children. So, they'll face down potential threats with bravery.
+7 votes
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Personally, I love having my Boxers, Janice and Leroy, in my lap. Well, sort of in my lap, LOL! Theyre kind of able to get halfway up, with their front paws on my thighs (and sometimes my shoulders!) and then they just kind of lean into me. Its sort of the Boxer equivalent of a hug.
+1 vote
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Unsocialized Boxers are dangerous but well-socialized Boxers are not. Despite the fact that they are top 10 dangerous dogs, socialized Boxers not at all dangerous. Boxers are one of the top 10 dangerous dogs according to U.S Dog Bite Fatalities but this does not mean that they are dangerous. The attacks have their reason behind it.
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" Will my Boxer protect me and my kids? " Would most dogs protect your home from burglary? " Will my Cocker Spaniel protect me if I am attacked? " Would my Siberian Husky protect me? " Do Beagle protect home or me if I am getting hit? " Will my pet dog protect me from intruders? " Can dogs really keep thieves away from your ...

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