Will milk chocolate kill a dog?

Asked By: Bridget Heidenreich
Date created: Tue, May 4, 2021 8:01 PM
Best answers

In large enough amounts, chocolate and cocoa products can kill your dog.

The toxic component of chocolate is theobromine.

Humans easily metabolize theobromine, but dogs process it much more slowly, allowing it to build up to toxic levels in their system.

Answered By: Ricky Batz
Date created: Wed, May 5, 2021 10:04 PM
FAQ
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Some dogs have no problems digesting milk and dairy products.

Yet others experience acute intestinal distress — like gas, diarrhea or vomiting — whenever they consume these kinds of foods.

It all comes down to how your dog handles a specific nutrient found in milk — a nutrient known as lactose.

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Symptoms of dog chocolate poisoning include vomiting (which may include blood), diarrhoea, restlessness and hyperactivity, rapid breathing, muscle tension, incoordination, increased heart rate and seizures. The effect and signs of chocolate poisoning in dogs depend on the amount eaten and the size of the breed.
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The toxic component of chocolate is theobromine.

Humans easily metabolize theobromine, but dogs process it much more slowly, allowing it to build up to toxic levels in their system.

A small amount of chocolate will probably only give your dog an upset stomach with vomiting or diarrhea.

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Typically a puppy or kitten will eat about 1 oz (30 mls) of commercial puppy formula for every 8 oz of body weight (1/2 pound) in a 24 hour period.

So using the table below, divide total amount of formula needed for 24 hours into the number of feeding listed based on age.

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If you think your pooch might've eaten chocolate - especially the darker kinds - call your vet right away.

She'll ask about your dog's size, what kind of chocolate he ate, and how much.

She might want you to make your dog vomit or simply watch his behavior, says vet Tina Wismer, DVM.

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Generally, an adult average sized dog at 12 months of age, weighs about twice their weight at 4 months of age, or 2.5x the weight at 14 weeks.

Adult giant breeds grow more slowly, take longer to mature, and don't reach adult growth until they're at least 16-18 months old.

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Between the age of 6 to 8 weeks old, your puppy should be taken to the vet for their first inoculation and then repeated every 3 to 4 weeks until about 4 months of age.

Do not feed your puppy cow's milk, as dogs are lactose-intolerant and milk can cause diarrhoea.

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